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Our town

What the newspapers said 100 years ago

by -- Carol Johnson
September 16, 2010 08:44 AM | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This house on Plattekill Avenue was built in 1829 by Abel Saxton. For nearly 50 years the home was owned by Aldert Schoonmaker, the village tailor, who made clothes for the young and old of our town. In 1881, the residence was bought by attorney John N. Vanderlyn. Mr. Vanderlyn raised the second story of the original house in 1884 and built additions on both ends and the rear of the house in 1907. In August 1910, he had a concrete walk and steps leading to the street constructed and coping placed atop the stone wall. This stone wall became a great viewing place to watch parades march by on Plattekill Avenue.
This house on Plattekill Avenue was built in 1829 by Abel Saxton. For nearly 50 years the home was owned by Aldert Schoonmaker, the village tailor, who made clothes for the young and old of our town. In 1881, the residence was bought by attorney John N. Vanderlyn. Mr. Vanderlyn raised the second story of the original house in 1884 and built additions on both ends and the rear of the house in 1907. In August 1910, he had a concrete walk and steps leading to the street constructed and coping placed atop the stone wall. This stone wall became a great viewing place to watch parades march by on Plattekill Avenue.
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The ‘‘Our town’’ column is compiled each month for the New Paltz Times by Carol Johnson, coordinator of the Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection. The entries have been copied from the August 1910 issues of the New Paltz Independent. If you would like to get a closer look at these newspapers of the past, visit Carol Johnson and the staff of the Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection at the Elting Memorial Library, located at 93 Main Street, or call 255-5030. Meanwhile, enjoy these words from a century ago.

The silver loving cups, tea set and ice pitcher in the window of Joslin & Carpenter at Newburgh are prizes to be given at the field day of the Grangers’ Association of Ulster County in Storr’s Grove on Aug. 3. This is an annual event of the Grangers and has become so popular in recent years that thousands from along the Hudson River attend. This year, the management wanted something out of the ordinary and called to their assistance Arthur Youngs of Youngs and Company of Newburgh to devise something that would bring out the automobilists. They decided on a parade of decorated automobiles and an obstacle race. The parade of decorated autos has been an attraction at county fairs, outings and gatherings where autos are assembled. The Ellenville and Liberty parades of flower-bedecked machines have become famous. An obstacle race for an automobile seems to be a dangerous thing, but as Mr. Young says, there is nothing but fun in it. The obstacles are to be dummy figures of clowns, farmers, etc. stationed along the route to be passed over by the machines. The distance to be covered by the autos will be but 100 feet, yet they will be required to dodge all the time. The course will be straight away so far as the track is concerned, but there will be “Dead Men’s curves innumerable.” The judges will award the prizes on a basis of grace of action, close proximity to the obstacle passed, the speed, etc.

At the field day, the automobile obstacle course was run on Main Street, which was strewn with piles of blankets, stuffed images and a monster Billiken. Mr. J.M. Hepworth, who drove a light Maxwell runabout won. The prize was a silver water pitcher. In the automobile race for ladies the entries were Mrs. W.T. Stewart and Miss Arlene Hepworth. Mrs. Stewart won. The prize was a silver tea set.

A number of people on their way to Mohonk come to our village by automobile and leave their machines here and go to Mohonk by stage. Automobiles are not allowed on the road from New Paltz to Mohonk.

There are a very large number of visitors of late at the Memorial House. Most of them are summer boarders at New Paltz and vicinity. However, there are a number who come in automobiles.

Ira DuBois has had some 15 or 20 guests at his summer boarding house on the trolley line. There are some 50 or more people from the city at Sunset Inn, and some at Wm. Atkins and elsewhere along the trolley line.

Rev. Mr. Bayles, of Bayonne, N.J., formerly of Gardiner, preached two good sermons in the Reformed church in this village on last Sunday. There were over 30 wagons in the church yard on Sunday morning, which seems something like old times. A considerable portion of the farms are now occupied by people of Irish parentage, who attend the Catholic Church. The attendance of people from the village is much larger than in former years as the village has grown greatly. Some come to church in automobiles.

The construction of the aqueduct tube has now advanced about 200 yards on the cut and cover portion of the route, just this side of the mouth of the Bonticoe tunnel. The stone-crushing plant is in operation and the crushed stone will be transported to points along the line to be used in manufacturing the tube.

When the blasts are exploded on Bonticoe Point in procuring rock for the stone crushing plant, the echo comes sounding back from the Normal School building.

About 100 loads of gravel were drawn on our village streets last week from the recently formed island in the Wallkill, below the old Academy.

Mrs. Pierce, director of the library play, reached New Paltz on Monday and is conducting rehearsals every afternoon and evening. Everyone who knows Mrs. Pierce will be glad to hear that she has consented to do a specialty herself this year -- “If I Were a Big Red Rose” -- as part of the program.

John D. Arbuckle, the millionaire sugar maker, arrived in New Paltz on Friday accompanied by 50 New York children, who were delighted to exchange the dusty air and sticky asphalt of Manhattan for salubrious atmosphere and grassy carpet of the Arbuckle fresh air reservation for kids along the Wallkill Valley Railroad near New Paltz village. Matrons and servants to look after the youngsters arrived with them.

Edward Minerley caught a four-pound bass in the Wallkill on Monday. Ed is an expert fisherman and knows where and how to catch big bass.

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